Report predicts growth for flexible packaging

Flexible packaging in the United States grew last year and is expected to continue to grow this year, according to a new report by the Flexible Packaging Association.

The industry grew by 2.8 percent in 2013 to become a $27.2 billion industry, and 2014 forecasted growth is expect to be 3.8 percent, the Linthicum, Md.-based trade group said. That would bring revenue to $28.2 billion for 2014.

These details are in the newly released State of the Flexible Packaging Industry Report from the association.

The report, available as a benefit of FPA membership and for $3,500 for non-members, includes information about the growth, sales/volume expectations, profitability and capital spending of the U.S. industry.

The report also covers: materials and processes; end uses; industry structure and consolidation; imports and exports; and industry issues, challenges and vision, FPA said.

Original Article: http://www.plasticsnews.com/article/20140821/NEWS/140829982/report-predicts-growth-for-flexible-packaging#

News Update In Gluten-Free Product Labeling – Does Your Label Make The Grade?

New standards for gluten-free product labeling now in effect

Under new FDA guidelines, products that say they are gluten-free must actually be gluten-free.

Before Tuesday, the term was unregulated, The Associated Pressreports, and manufacturers were able to determine what “gluten free” meant on a case by case basis. Last year, it was announced that products with the words “gluten free” on the packaging must have less than 20 parts per million of gluten, essentially making them free of wheat, rye, and barley.

The move comes as more and more people become aware of celiac disease, which causes bloating, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and other issues, and is more intense than gluten sensitivity. “[This is] raising awareness that there is a disease associated with the gluten-free diet,” Alice Bast of the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness told The Associated Press.

The American Celiac Disease Alliance says about three million Americans have celiac disease, and there’s a lot of money to be made by offering this segment of the population — and the millions more cutting out gluten for other reasons — special products: Gluten-free food sales brought in about $4 billion last year. That’s why the CEO of Boulder Brands, which owns gluten-free food companies Udi’s and Glutino, is fine with the regulations. “If consumers can’t have confidence in the products, long-term, it’s going to hurt the overall trend,” Steve Hughes said.

Original Source: http://theweek.com/speedreads/index/265898/speedreads-new-standards-for-gluten-free-product-labeling-now-in-effect

 

Getting The Most Out Of Your Product Label

When it comes to product labeling there are so many aspects that one little label needs to cover. This is why it is so important that products choose a label that allows the company the most bang for its buck. Options in labeling are plentiful. Some options offer up more product space to display important product information than others. Not every type of product label is suitable for your industry or product. It is important to look at the industry options, consider your product and the advantages and disadvantages of each product labeling option.

Your product label is used to display directions on proper use, storage and handling of the product. Along with this important information the label is used to promote the brand image which helps create permanent product identification. Different industries are forced to use different labeling options because of the volatility of their products. For instance, when automobile manufacturers are looking to label products that must be careful to select a product label that is both heat and oil resistant. Frozen foods must use labeling that is waterproof where as beverage companies are prone to use labeling that offers a sealed cap. The label you choose will need to be suitable to your product to withstand the conditions the product will go through in all stages of the marketing process.

When creating a product label it is important that your design takes into consideration the practical purpose of the label. Not only is it important to create brand and product awareness but the product packaging and label should be useful. Provide information on your label that allows your brand to stick out and offer something unique.

Labels are used in a variety of industries and for a vast array of applications. Labels must be of high quality, offer a useful design and be beneficial to both end users and you as the business owner. If you are working with products that have special requirements and need to meet rigid testing the label should clearly state how your product meets and exceeds all industry standards. Not only are you looking to create a label with a catchy design for consumers but also to convey a message of safety and industry responsibility.

The most common use of product labels today is to increase brand recognition and to enhance consumer recollection of your product. It is just as important that your label is convenient upon scanning consumers at check out as it is that your product stands out above the competition. Not only are your labels promoting your brand, attracting consumer attention but also allows the customer to gain insight into your company’s brand and manufacturing process.

At Anchor Printing, we take pride in offering our clients cut & stack labeling, pressure sensitive labels, roll-fed labeling, shrink sleeves as well as flexible packaging options. Contact us today at http://anchorprinting.com for all of your product label design, printing and packaging needs.

Proper Labeling Is A Key Element In Product Advertising

One of the most important aspects of your product is advertising.   Your product is truly only as good as your marketing and promotions.  Without proper marketing the majority of the public would have no way to know what the product is, how it benefits them or where they can purchase it.  Your product label is one of the most significant aspects in maximizing your product and its exposure.

When it comes to labeling there are many options to choose from including some of the most common; cut & stack, pressure sensitive, roll-fed and shrink sleeve labeling.  One of the best types of labels with a variety of benefits is the shrink sleeve.

Branding is what identifies a company to its customers.  A majority of consumers will purchase products and services from brands that they are familiar with.  If your company sells cheese and moves into the salad dressing market, your customers will often follow.  Your brand is what is selling your products.  People associate product characteristics such as quality to the brand not necessarily the individual product.  Branding is created using custom labels such as shrink sleeves.  Shrink sleeves leave more room to promote different aspects of the product and brand.  There is three hundred sixty degrees of space from the top of the product to the bottom to promote all aspects of not only the product but the company’s brand.

Another overwhelming benefit in shrink sleeve labeling is the flexibility and strength of the label.  With traditional labels the products container must conform to a certain size and shape.  With shrink sleeve labeling the product label conforms to any shape packaging.  Not only does this allow you creative freedom with product packaging but also reduces waste and cuts down the chances of the product being damaged when shipped.  Your product is individually shrink-wrapped when using shrink sleeve manufacturing.

With new biodegradable materials shrink sleeves are manufactured using more environmentally conscious materials.  This along with the elimination or product labeling waste makes shrink sleeve labels a more popular labeling option than some more traditional options.  The extra protection that the shrink sleeve offers the product also eliminates the need for heavy packaging and wrapping thus decreasing the size of the shipment saving companies money.

Shrink sleeve labels allow the company to promote their brand as well as saving on money while continuing to be conscious of environmental needs.  With the money companies save using shrink sleeve labeling they can continue to develop products and enhance the company brand.

At Anchor Printing, we take pride in offering our clients cut & stack labeling, pressure sensitive labels, roll-fed labeling, shrink sleeves as well as flexible packaging options. Contact us today at http://anchorprinting.com for all of your label design, printing and packaging needs.

Creating A Product Identity

The identity of products comes from a variety of things including the packaging and labeling. Both aspects play a fundamental part when it comes to creating an image for your brand within your group of customers. Every detail is important when it comes to the design of your package and the product’s label. If you fail to consider this the reduction in sales can be devastating to your company and product.

When it comes to your products your package there are four separate elements that it brings to light. Not only does the package promote the product, it is useful to consumers, while enabling recycling and reducing damage to the environment. All four of these elements are essential in marketing your company’s product.

Labeling allows your products package to deliver several messages about your product. On your products label you can promote benefits that your product has over the competition. The label is used to create brand goodwill with proof that your product and company share the same values.

An example of this is an image of a happy, healthy athletic family used on the label to promote a new type of healthy, convenient, easy to pack snack. The label speaks to consumers that see themselves and their families in the family on the label. Adding nutritional information that adds to the appeal is also helpful when creating a label that speaks to your target market.

When creating a product package and/or label another element that speaks volume for your company and product is the logo and color scheme. How is your product packaged differently from your competitors? A package that is shaped differently than others or has a catchy color scheme is important in differentiating your product. If your competitors are all into vivid, bright, outspoken colors and logos go in the opposite direction. Standing out isn’t always about being wild and crazy it is about being different.

Not only should your product packaging and labeling attract consumers but it should also be practical. Practicality is an important part of creating a product and establishing a brand. You see this in the market place with easy to carry packages for on the go consumers including packages that allow you to reseal leftovers for later. When designing a flexible package remember to take into consideration your product as well as the most convenient way it can be used by your customers.

Along with all of the above your products package and labeling should be cohesive with other products that represent your brand. The packaging and labeling should match your line in order to create unification amongst your brand. When consumers see your products logo, package and label should work together to create brand consistency.

At Anchor Printing, we take pride in offering our clients cut & stack labeling, pressure sensitive labels, roll-fed labeling, shrink sleeves as well as flexible packaging options. Contact us today at http://anchorprinting.com for all of your product label design, printing and packaging needs.

The Five Things Product Packaging Must Do

Consumer products brand design is wrongly predicated on the notion that shoppers make rational, informed decisions. In truth, most are purely instinctive and reactive. Eye-tracking studies show that consumers read on average only seven words in an entire shopping trip, buying instinctively by color, shape and familiarity of location. Best sellers succeed by appealing to the reptilian brain, which decides before logic has a chance.

Instinctive reactions can be designed into packaging through the application of Biomotive Triggers. These are sensory cues that affect our subconscious, generating emotion and action before the conscious part of our brain can respond. There are lots of triggers, and we have identified 16 key combinations that are interconnected. Understanding these primal cues can help brands connect emotionally with consumers, build defendable assets and sell more products.

To be successful, every brand must have a distinctive point of view and be able to express this clear and unique reason for being. Effective packaging makes it easy to understand at a glance, who I am, what I am, and why I am relevant to your life. Naturally, the product has to deliver on its promise to ensure repeat purchase.

1. Stand out. You need to make your brand the consumer’s signpost to the category. Just covering the shelf and shouting louder than everyone else won’t cut it. You need a point of orientation on the package that draws a shopper’s eye and communicates the essence of the proposition. One way to do this is with cusps. Cusps are sharp, pointy shapes that trigger feelings of fear, danger and caution. You couldn’t miss the ads for Maleficent before the Disney premiere, because everything from the typeface to Angelina Jolie’s clothing, headdress and eye makeup formed cusp shapes that demanded your attention. Similarly, you can’t miss Nexxus on the shelf, because the cusp shapes in the logo attract your eye and thus stand out on the shelf.

2. Be Simple. Simple design is more effective. In a busy, visually agitated market, we so rarely experience moments of visual or auditory calm that we gravitate toward it. Buster, the drain cleaner once barking on the heels of Mr. Muscle (Europe’s Mr. Clean), unseated the giant in England by introducing a small pack devoid of the power graphics that typify products in the aisle. An Elmwood client, Buster also recognized the emotional agitation of consumers who need to unclog a drain, and answered it with a calm, clean, simple package that contrasted with the visual noise at the shelf. Sales rose 42% and market share hit 30% with no above-the-line support, and the brand is now expanding into Europe and Asia.

3. Pass the five-year-old test. If you can describe your brand to a five-year-old, send them into a store to find it, and actually get it, your packaging creates an iconic connection. Consumers will come back week after week looking for it. The key to this stickiness is a distinctive brand mark. For example, you could tell a five-year-old, to get the salt pack with the girl in a yellow coat with an umbrella on it; she will come back with Morton Salt. Similarly, ask for the blue pack with the big black and white cookie splashed in milk, and he will return with a package of Oreos.

4. Trigger emotional engagement. Consumers act when a brand makes them feel something. When someone looks at you, you’re compelled to look back to determine the nature of the attraction. That’s your survival instinct at work. For this reason, there’s nothing more powerful in packaging than eye contact. The next time you’re in an aisle, notice how many packages bear photos of people that don’t make direct eye contact; they’re looking away, or slightly past you.

5. Create iconic assets. The best packaging creates a series of visual equities, a sort of tool kit that can be transferred to every form of consumer communication. Coke is the master of this. The brand has an array of assets – the agitated red, the dynamic contour wave, the iconic bottle shape and the logo typography – that can all be used to help amplify the brand experience. People think the Coca-Cola logo is all about the signature and flowing curves. But look closer, and you’ll see three cusps– two under the “C” and the “a” of Coca and one in the center of the “C” in Cola – that focus your eyes on the center of the words. From there your eyes can take in the curves and the suggestion of flow that’s accentuated by the rest of the typography and amplified by the bottle. The assets are so memorable that even the suggestion of one in any marketing communication connotes the feelings associated with the brand.

At a time when many consumers actively screen out marketing messages, the surest place for CMOs to make a bigger impact is at the point of consideration. This can be done consciously when Biomotive Triggers are designed into packaging. The creativity conversation shifts from subjective likes and dislikes to the science underlying attraction, which allows design to be accountable for quantifiable sales uplift. That way, manufacturers and retailers can make more informed choices that make more money.

Original Source: http://www.forbes.com/sites/onmarketing/2014/07/23/the-five-things-product-packaging-must-do/