Category Archives: Industry News

Pressure-sensitive labels continue to thrive

The pressure-sensitive labels market achieved growth of 3.9 percent year-on-year in 2016, greater growth than that of the label market as a whole, and still commands 40 percent market share, according to the latest findings from AWA Alexander Watson Associates.

AWA’s Label Market Study 2017 reported this growth despite challenges to pressure-sensitive from other labeling and packaging options

Further findings in the report see Asia now the leading region for pressure-sensitive label demand, surpassing the developed markets of Europe and North America. The format’s largest end-use market segment, globally, is food labeling, taking 27 percent of 2016 volumes, mostly used for primary product labels.

Corey M Reardon, AWA Alexander Watson Associates president and CEO, added: ‘Variable information print (VIP) labels are a strong growth area for the versatile pressure-sensitive label, in line with the increasing requirements of today’s transportation and logistics activities, in terms not only of track-and-trace, and stock and inventory management, but also for product authentication, such as RFID-enabled labels.

‘What is more, online consumer purchasing activities are continuing to drive VIP label developments and usage. Pressure-sensitive labels are also extremely adaptable in terms of their available application technologies, which can vary from hand-held label printers for individual packs to mass serialization on the label press.’

In relation to the overall product decoration market, Reardon commented that, while glue applied labels continue to enjoy ‘substantial usage globally’, new sleeving technologies are taking a larger share of the market and continue to grow, while, ‘in-mold labeling remains a niche but growing market.

‘Direct-to-container digital print is an area to watch, and flexible packaging has the capability to revolutionize the whole product packaging market.

‘Labelexpo Europe 2017 will be a fascinating opportunity to review the status quo.’

The upcoming AWA Label Release Liner Industry Seminar and AWA Shrink Sleeve European Seminar coincide with Labelexpo Europe 2017. Find out more about these events in the L&L Events diary.

Original Source: http://www.labelsandlabeling.com/news/latest/pressure-sensitive-labels-continue-thrive

Original Date: Aug 11 2017

Original Author: Staff Writer

 

Reliably consistent induction sealing pays off

F-MATIC, headquartered in Lehi, UT, is an expert developer and supplier of long-lasting fragrances packaged in easy-to-use dispensers. The company customizes odor control and sanitizing products for retail, janitorial, and hospitality markets. The odor-controlling fragrances are released based on room air flow, and the fragrance mixture contains a molecular odor counteractant.

One of F-MATIC’s newest products is the patented Passive Air System, designed to release high-end fragrances in an environmentally conscious way. Container/dispenser construction details are considered proprietary. But the company did divulge that the wick is more exposed to the air, providing a stronger scent. The technology does not require batteries, fuel cells, or any other artificial power source.

To package the Passive Air System, Shawn Yeats, F-MATIC’s Director of Operations, and his development team had to create a custom packaging line that fills, seals, caps, and applies shrink sleeve labels to the custom-designed 50-mL plastic containers. F-MATIC employs the services of multiple shrink sleeve labeling system suppliers—the principle one being Traco Manufacturing Inc.

Consumers remove the shrink sleeve label and twist and click the cap to activate the product for use. A knife within the cap punctures an induction seal, enabling the fragrances to be released when needed.

Induction sealing considerations
The induction seal is crucial to the effectiveness of the packaging. A hermetic seal prevents the product from leaking during distribution. As Yeats notes, “Eliminating leaks is critical, as it not only ensures product integrity, but also provides confidence throughout our various distribution channels that the fragrances will not spill or be released before their intended use.”

F-MATIC first launched small-batch production of the Passive Air System in 2012. The company used a hand-held induction sealer from China, but the results were inconsistent. Yeats and his staff later turned to Enercon Industries Corp. for advice.

Enercon offered to seal some sample containers in their own laboratories to determine the optimum equipment to meet F-MATIC’s needs. Enercon manufactures two types of induction sealers—hand-held and in-line conveyor-mounted models. The principles of induction sealing are the same for both types. When energized by the power supply, the sealing head produces an electromagnetic current, called an eddy current. Capped containers are exposed to this current, and the foil of the inner seal generates electrical resistance, heating the foil. The hot foil then melts the polymer coating on the inner seal. Heat, coupled with the pressure of the cap, causes the inner seal to bond to the container lip, creating a hermetic seal.

After careful evaluation, F-MATIC opted for Enercon’s Super Seal™ in-line conveyor-mounted system, which includes a narrow sealing tunnel that boosts extra heat-sealing energy into the foil liner. This system also offers greater flexibility to increase line speeds in the future, if needed.

According to Yeats, “The great people at Enercon were very involved in the installation from start to finish. They stayed in regular contact with phone calls, plant visits, and video instructions. And we saved money and time by changing over to the Enercon sealer. Ever since we installed the Super Seal™ cap sealer, we have not had a single sealing issue. It’s allowed us to grow our diverse line of cleaning and odor control products faster, and we’ve completely eliminated any conversations about leaking. We now are offering contract packaging services.

Original Source: https://www.packworld.com/article/machinery/fillingsealing/capping/reliably-consistent-induction-sealing-pays

Original Author:

Original Date: July 27 2017

Urbanization is Key for the Proliferation of Flexible Packaging on Consumer Goods

Flexible packaging is perhaps one of the more important innovations from the packaging industry over the past. Flexible packaging lowers the total weight of a ready product. Additionally, it reduces the size that each packaged item takes during storage and transportation. This allows a greater number of goods to be stored in one location.

The global flexible packaging market is expected to reach US$358.7 bn by the end of 2024. This revenue is being projected at a CAGR of 5.2% within a forecast period from 2015 to 2024.in 2014, the global flexible packaging market was valued at US$238.5 bn. Here are three questions answered by industry experts from Transparency Market Research. The answers to these questions will broaden the knowledge base for many readers.

  1. How Will Accelerated Urbanization in Emerging Economies Benefit the Global Flexible Packaging Market?

The revenue generated in the global flexible packaging market over consumer goods is expected to reach US$278.4 bn by the end of 2024. This is a massive quotation for the global flexible packaging market based on a single sector of application, but the consumer industry has always been the primary application segment for all sorts of packaging. Due to the high demand volume for flexible packaging that already exists in the world, even the currently stagnated demand growth is not going to be large enough to stunt the profitability for flexible packaging manufacturers from consumer goods.

A key reason for the consumer goods dominance over flexible packaging demand is the global urban population. The urban localities hold the overwhelming majority of demand for packaging of items. The current penetration of flexible packaging by its manufacturers is adding to an already impetuous growth rate of urban areas and populations in the world. As economies develop and disposable income percentages increase, flexible packaging will continue to show an increasing appearance rate in the urban markets.

  1. Will Europe Continue to Show a Strong for Flexible Packaging?

Till 2024, Europe is expected to stay the top region for flexible packaging in terms of demand and overall market attractiveness. By the end of 2024, Europe is expected to generate US$117.7 bn in flexible packaging revenue due to added investments, the use of modern and more effective materials and manufacturing techniques, and stronger regulations regarding the volume of plastics used and disposed. At the same time, while the overall growth in demand for flexible packaging in Europe continues towards stagnation, the total volume of demand is already so high that it will ensure regional dominance for the continent in the global flexible packaging market for the coming years.

The growing impact of flexible packaging in emerging economies is also growing at a rapid pace. An example of this would be the setting up of multiple flexible packaging plants in India by Huhtamaki PPL. In developed economies, mergers and takeovers and the incorporation of modern technology take a higher priority, such as the addition of film extrusion films by leading flexible packaging manufacturer Transcontinental, Inc.

  1. Will Flexible Packaging Ever be Considered a Primary Packaging Mode?

Flexible packaging could very well become one of the primary packaging methods in the market. The market has recently been introduced with much advancement in technology that has allowed the producers of flexible packaging. The food and beverage industry is absolutely well-versed on the advantages that flexible packaging will be bringing to the table. It significantly reduces the volume of storage required for foods that are otherwise packed in boxed packaging which can easily reduce number of items in one volume of area.

Original Source: http://www.itbusinessnet.com/article/Urbanization-is-Key-for-the-Proliferation-of-Flexible-Packaging-on-Consumer-Goods-5058681

Original Author: Transparency Market Research

Original Date: July 21 2017

New Shelf-life Extending Packaging Technologies

I recently had discussions with experts from both Nova Chemicals (U.S. office in Moon Township, Penn) and Mitsubishi Gas Chemical America (U.S. office in New York City), regarding their new flexible, shelf-extending packaging technologies. Both companies will showcase these technologies at Pack Expo Las Vegas, Sept. 25-27.  Here’s the scoop:

Nova Chemicals has developed two easily recyclable flexible packaging film structures: one that is based on a moisture barrier formulation for items such as dry foods and mixes, frozen fruit, and confectionary; and, one with both a moisture and oxygen barrier formulation for nut mixes, granola bars, meats and cheeses and other snack foods that have traditionally required rigid or non-recyclable mixed-material packaging

These resin formulations, including LLDPE and HDPE, are based on Nova’s dual-reactor Advanced Sclairtech Technology which produces a broad range of single-site catalyzed octane copolymers.

Food packaging market manager Mike Cappelli says:

“Our design team set out using this technology to design polyethylene film resin formulations for multilayer packaging—some for stiffness, some for sealant, some for barrier…This is a win for customers, the industry and the environment. It speaks to the consumer desire for lightweight, economical and sustainable packaging.”

 Both base recipes are certified to carry the “In store drop-off” package label from How2Recycle, a rapidly growing program to help consumers understand end-of-life recycling options. Also, the designs are compatible with the #2 HDPE recycling stream.

The new structure designs can be used in a wide variety of package formats, including the popular and fast-growing stand-up pouch, pillow pouch, and flow wrapper. Also, packages can be customized for single-serve or multi-use through addition of zippers or fitments. Processors and converters can work with Nova’s experts at its Centre for Performance Applications to collaborate on film structures for the specific applications. The Centre recently completed installation of its new Effytec horizontal fill seal (HFFS) pouch maker, which will allow creation of prototype packages that can be tested on-site.  In addition to excellent barrier properties, Cappelli adds that field experience has shown that traditional printing and inks are used with no problem with reverse print so it’s not subject to a mess or surface printing.

MGC has developed a technology that potentially doubles shelf life for organic and natural foods. Embedded as a film layer in either LLDPE or PP retort packaging applications, it removes oxygen from within sealed bags and pouches. The technology is based on MGC’s oxygen-scavenging Ageless OMAC technology which is made by compounding an iron powder as the active ingredient and is sandwiched between a barrier layer and a sealant layer. The technology is now available as a resin to North American film producers and converters, and can efficiently run on legacy processing systems.

The embedded film layer has been shown to extend and protect food’s natural characteristics without sachets, added spices or sodium. It is said to be ideally suited for soups, sauces, processed fruit, dips, protein bars, prepared meals and wet pet foods, which are particularly vulnerable to food spoilage.

“We offer food processors a free-assessment to determine the increased shelf life that our technology will bring to their brands. Our technology will help food manufacturers build greater consumer preference and brand loyalty for their natural and organic and gluten-free products.” He also added that Mitsubishi will provide resin samples to film processors and converters to test run the technology.

Original Author: Lilli Manolis Sherman

Original Date: 7/6/2017

 

In California Battles Over Product Labels, Industry Usually Wins

Nail polish and hair dye. Cleaning products. Plants and flowers for the garden.

All of these could get new labels under proposals being considered by California lawmakers, triggering an annual conflict in the state Capitol over how much to tell people about what they buy at the store or use at work.

The bills reflect a recurring tension in the statehouse: environmentalists and consumer advocates argue that people have a right to know what’s in everyday products, while industry lobbyists say putting too much information on a label could harm sales by creating unfounded fear.

In most cases, industry wins.

Already this year, the Democratic-controlled Legislature sidelined a bill to label soda and other sugary drinks with warnings that they contribute to obesity, diabetes and tooth decay — a proposal lawmakers have rejected for the last few years. They also killed a different bill that would have added warning labels to foods containing synthetic dyes. In past years, lawmakers rejected bills to label genetically engineered foods and require ingredients to be listed on the labels of cleaning products.

“You’re fighting the manufacturers, the retailers, the chemistry industry and a long list of business groups who are probably irrelevant with the general public but are highly relevant within the Capitol,” said Richard Holober, executive director of the Consumer Federation of California, which supports more information on labels. “It’s almost always an uphill battle.”

Business groups that oppose such bills work to influence the process in ways big and small. They donate to political campaigns, hire well-connected lobbyists and provide goodies to lawmakers and their staffs. As PepsiCo lobbied against the soda-labeling bill this year, it donated more than $3,800 worth of products to fundraising parties for four lawmakers, including $442 to an event for Sen. Ed Hernandez, chairman of the health committee in which the bill stalled.

The Personal Care Products Council, which opposes legislation to list ingredients on beauty products, hosts an annual reception for lawmakers and their staffs. Thirty of them attended last year’s event at a swanky restaurant near the Capitol, and the group gave gift bags to an additional 145.

A union representing janitors supports Senate Bill 258, which would require that cleaning products carry labels listing all ingredients.
A union representing janitors supports Senate Bill 258, which would require that cleaning products carry labels listing all ingredients. (Getty Images)

The business groups also make persuasive arguments about the downsides of slapping products with new labels: The supply chain becomes complicated if one state requires labels different from others, label requirements create the potential for new lawsuits and consumers could become confused by label information without much context.

“If you say there’s a chemical in something, the connotation is that it’s bad, when in reality chemicals serve a number of valuable purposes,” said Michael Shaw, a lobbyist for the California Manufacturers & Technology Association. “It creates concerns about the product that aren’t necessarily legitimate concerns.”

The possibility that new labels could change what people buy is exactly why these bills remain a perpetual battleground in Sacramento. Here are a few bills still pending that would require new product labels:

What’s in that window cleaner?

Senate Bill 258, by Sen. Ricardo Lara (D-Bell Gardens), would require that cleaning products carry labels listing all ingredients and a pictogram illustrating their potential health effects. Environmentalists, health advocates and a union representing janitors support the bill, arguing that it would allow people to avoid products that may cause them harm.

“I have seen firsthand how chemicals have impacted my coworkers through breathing problems or exposure to the skin,” janitor Marvin Mugallo testified at a hearing in March.

The chemical industry, as well as groups representing manufacturers and retailers, are fighting the bill. They say disclosing ingredients could give away trade secrets and listing potentially hundreds of chemicals on a label is impractical for companies and unhelpful to consumers.

“Just because a product might contain a certain chemical, it would be inappropriate to send a message that that product may somehow be harmful to human health and the environment,” said Tim Shestek, a lobbyist for the American Chemistry Council.

Lawmakers killed a similar proposal last year.

Hair dye and health concerns

Beauty products sold at the retail level already must list their ingredients. Assembly Bill 1575, by Assemblyman Ash Kalra (D-San Jose), would put a similar requirement on cosmetics used in beauty salons. The bill is supported by many groups that advocate for women’s health; their position is that hair stylists and nail salon workers are exposed to harsh chemicals on the job.

“At work, I often experience headaches and skin rashes that I believe may be related to the products I used. Many of my co-workers experience similar symptoms,” nail salon worker Kathy Pham testified.

The Personal Care Products Council opposes the bill, saying it already lists cosmetic ingredients on information sheets that salons are required to make available to their employees.

“Our companies often provide [this] information in multiple languages — not just English — in recognition of the diversity of the workplace professionals that use our products,” said Thomas Myers, a lawyer for the group.

Could your daisies hurt bees?

Advocates who want to stem the ongoing decline in the population of bees have proposed Senate Bill 602, filed by Sen. Ben Allen (D-Santa Monica), which would add a new label to flowers and plants that have been treated with certain pesticides. Nursery shoppers would see a label that says, “State of California Safety Warning: May harm bees,” on plants and seed packets treated with a class of chemicals known as neonicotinoids.

Those chemicals have been found in tomato plants, salvias and daisies, and remain in the plant long after the initial application, said Paul Towers, organizing director of the Pesticide Action Network, which supports the measure. Labels would help consumers, he said, because many “don’t have any knowledge that products they’re purchasing may in fact harm bees or kill them outright.”

Numerous agricultural groups and gardening stores oppose the bill. Their lobbyist, Louis Brown Jr., challenged the value of a new label, saying it “informs consumers of very little.”

“In our mind,” he said, “warning without context is nothing but … instigating fear to keep people from buying products.”

CALmatters is a nonprofit journalism venture dedicated to exploring state policies and politics. For more stories by Laurel Rosenhall, go to calmatters.org/newsanalysis.

Original Source: https://ww2.kqed.org/news/2017/06/01/in-california-battles-over-product-labels-industry-usually-wins/

Article Author: By Laurel Rosenhall

Date: JUNE 1, 2017

Global Shrink Sleeve Label Market Is Expected to Cross 14 Billion by the End of 2022

Global Shrink Sleeve Labels Market Information by Type, Material, Application and region – Forecast to 2022

This press release was orginally distributed by SBWire

Pune, Maharashtra — (SBWIRE) — 05/15/2017 — Market Synopsis of Shrink Sleeve Labels Market

The key drivers for the growth of shrink sleeve labels market are its properties such as flexibility and added capabilities. The unique feature that sets it apart is tamper-evident packaging. Shrink sleeve labels are one of the most durable and ideal labels for products. The advantages of this particular market are 360 degree, design coverage, full color, abrasion, moisture resistance and wide capability. Shrink sleeve labels ensure protection from UV radiation. One of the biggest challenges of this particular market is recycling of the bottles they use it.

The competition in the labeling industry is growing due to continuous demand. Shrink sleeve labels are widely used in food and beverages, pharmaceuticals and personal care packaging industries. Labeling can have a strong impact on the buying decisions of customers. A colorful cover with quality labeling can attract customers. The Asia-Pacific region accounted for the fastest growing share in terms of value followed by North America and Europe. The Asia-Pacific region has developed significantly in the shrink sleeve & stretch sleeve labels market, with the fastest market growth happening in the regions of India and China. The region is marked with increasing demand for packaged food, easy availability of polymer films, and low labor cost. The global shrink sleeve label market is expected to cross 14 Billion growing at a CAGR of approximately 6% by the end of 2022.

Request a Sample Report @ https://www.marketresearchfuture.com/sample_request/1785

Market Segments of Shrink Sleeve Labels Market

Global Shrink Sleeve Labels Market Information segmented as:
-By Type (Stretch, and Shrink)
-By Material (PVC, PET-G, Expanded Polystyrene Films, PE, Polylactic Acid Films, and others)
-By Application (Food & Beverage, Pharmaceuticals, Personal Care, and others)

Key Players:

The key players of global shrink sleeve labels market report include
-Berry Plastics Corporation,
-Bonset America Corporation,CCL
-Industries Inc.,
-Fuji Seal International Inc.,
-Huhtamaki OYJ,
-Hammer Packaging Corp.,
-Klockner Pentaplast Corp.,
-Mac Farlane Group UK Ltd,,
-Polysack Ltd,

Browse Report Details @ https://www.marketresearchfuture.com/reports/shrink-sleeve-labels-market

Study Objectives of Shrink Sleeve Labels Market

To provide detailed analysis of the market structure along with forecast for the next 6 years of various segments and sub-segments of the Global Shrink Sleeve Labels Market

To provide insights about factors affecting the market growth

To analyze the Global Shrink Sleeve Labels Market based on various factors- price analysis, supply chain analysis, porters five force analysis etc.

Target Audience

-Manufactures
-Raw Materials Suppliers
-Aftermarket suppliers
-Research Institute / Education Institute
-Potential Investors
-Key executive (CEO and COO) and strategy growth manager.

Regional Analysis of Global Shrink Sleeve Labels Market

The Asia-Pacific region is the fastest growing market for global shrink sleeve labels, followed by North America and Europe. The Asia- Pacific region has developed significantly in the shrink sleeve & stretch sleeve labels market, especially countries like India and China.The region offers a lucrative market to packaging and labelling manufacturers due to changing market dynamics and economic development. The region has seen increased consumption of packaged food & beverages items along with healthcare awareness.This induces the demand for such labels from both food & beverages and pharmaceutical industries.

Product Analysis

-Product matrix which gives a detailed comparison of the market for different recycled product types

Additional Information

-Regulatory Landscape
-Pricing Analysis
-Macroeconomic Indicators

Geographic Analysis

-Geographical analysis across 15 countries

Company Information

-Profiling of 10 key market players
-In-depth analysis including SWOT analysis, and strategy information of related to report title
-Competitive landscape including emerging trends adopted by major companies

About Market Research Future
At Market Research Future (MRFR), we enable our customers to unravel the complexity of various industries through our Cooked Research Report (CRR), Half-Cooked Research Reports (HCRR), Raw Research Reports (3R), Continuous-Feed Research (CFR), and Market Research & Consulting Services.

MRFR team have supreme objective to provide the optimum quality market research and intelligence services to our clients. Our market research studies by products, services, technologies, applications, end users, and market players for global, regional, and country level market segments, enable our clients to see more, know more, and do more, which help to answer all their most important questions.

In order to stay updated with technology and work process of the industry, MRFR often plans & conducts meet with the industry experts and industrial visits for its research analyst members.

Original Source: http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/3344849

Custom Designed Shrink Sleeves

Custom designed shrink sleeves as we know are shrink wraps, are made of plastic or polyester film material. These are very much heat resistant and happen to be great label products. Moisture, friction they can easily encounter without losing their great durability.

Why Shrink Sleeves

This is an absolute necessity seeing from the point of view how we are using industrial products in our everyday lives. The shrink sleeves can generally be applied over, around the intended goods. Then they are heated either by using heated guns or are sent through shrink tunnel, for shrinking. So we can say it is kind of an overwrap that is done on various types of packaging. Cartons, beverage cans, boxes and pallet loads are few of the many products that cannot be completely done without shrink wraps being used. Not just industrial goods, shrink sleeves are many times used on book wraps, beverages, and pharmaceuticals.

The More Designed, the Better       

Shrink sleeves are manufactured in ways to give a great presentation. So, you can say the look and feel part in shrink sleeves happen to be of great importance. Be it a beverage container or your favorite water sipper, a great shrink sleeve can immediately draw attention to your thing in a jiffy. There are several manufacturers in the industry who cater to all kinds of your shrink sleeve needs. And they give 360 degree graphics coverage on all your containers and applications that you want to cater to your consumers for some great visibility. Presentation is precisely the reason that people use to go for custom designed shrink sleeves.

Using the Shrink Sleeves

As far as use of the shrink sleeves are concerned, they are absolutely many. These sleeves wrap buildings. Countries or regions affected by natural calamities use these sleeves in great amounts to cover rooftops post the powerful storms. For environmental containments too these can be used. They are largely used while removing environmental hazards like lead, asbestos etc. While buying CDs or DVDs most of you have noticed your favorite CDs, DVDs in these shrink sleeves. Foods such as some vegetables, meat, cheese, plants are often covered using shrink sleeves. Therefore, you can easily see how the use of shrink sleeves actually covers all the necessary areas of our lives.

Shrink sleeves as already mentioned before, come in various customised frames and they fit most of your containers of choice and can actually made to special shapes. The films that are used on the shrink sleeves are high-gloss OPS, PETG or PVC and they are equipped with the abilities to resist any kind of moisture and abrasion. The goods makers are sincerely concerned with the kinds of shrink sleeves they are using on their products. They believe the kick that they give to the products on shelves, the gloss, the presentation, is really important to make your products stand out from the rest.

At Anchor Printing, we take pride in offering our clients cut & stack labelling, pressure sensitive labels, roll-fed labelling, shrink sleeves as well as flexible packaging options. Contact us today at http://anchorprinting.com for all of your product label design, printing and packaging needs.

How to increase recycling of flexible packaging

How can you increase the recycling of your flexible packaging? Would a demand for recycled-content material in new flexible packages help? Jeff Wooster, global sustainability director at The Dow Chemical Co., weighs in on the idea.

On Fri., Mar. 3, Wooster spoke about flexible packaging recycling at the 2017 Flexible Packaging Assn. annual meeting, giving an update of where the industry currently is and what projects are in the works. He outlined five potential solutions to increase the recycling of flexible packaging:

1. Creative Designs—to make more flexible packages easily recyclable.

2. Increased Collection— to get more materials back into the system.

3. Better Sorting—to allow separation at scale.

4. More End Uses—to maximize the value of collected materials.

5. New Technologies—for mechanical and feedstock recycling.

For other types of packaging end-of-life scenarios, though, the use of recycled-content material helps fuel the market for recyclables—polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles, for example. Is this a missing piece in the flexible packaging recycling puzzle?

Let’s find out what one packaging recycling expert thinks.

Jeff, at one point during your presentation, you said “We’re not going to make flexible packaging back into flexible packaging.” Why not?

Wooster: For food packaging…We’re not going to be able to recycle flexible food packaging back into new flexible food packaging because of the [Food and Drug Administration] FDA requirements for purity and cleanliness and all the other things that are required for direct food contact compliance. But we can make flexible food packaging into other products.

We could, for example, take flexible packaging and make it into something like a heavy-duty shipping sack for fertilizer or lawn-and-garden use. So it can be made into new packaging applications, even flexible packaging, just not for direct food contact.

For food, and pharmaceuticals, and certain delicate consumer electronics that have high purity requirements, most likely we won’t use recycled content for those applications in the short-term because of the difficulty assuring that recycled materials are completely suitable for use with food.

For PET bottles by comparison…PET bottles can be recycled into PET bottles used for food and beverage applications. That’s compliant. The FDA has said that the process is fine, that it’s safe for consumers, and because of the way PET is recycled, it’s easier to assure safety and compliance. There is also a limited amount of high-density polyethylene in the marketplace that’s available for use in food packaging for things like bottles for juice. But it’s only one or two suppliers that have availability of the material that have received the FDA “no objection” letter, which says they don’t see any problem with this. The FDA doesn’t technically give their approval. What they say is they don’t object to it based on the scientific evidence submitted for their review.

But for packaging food in flexibles, there are few of the right kinds of materials available that typically need to be used in those packages that also have FDA compliance.  That’s why that particular application is not going to be in play, probably for in the near future. I wouldn’t say it’s impossible in the long term, but in the near future, recycled content plastics will not be used for flexible food packaging.

 

Do you see an increase in the near future, though, in the use of recycled content in other types of flexible packages, for non-food applications?

Wooster: I do expect to see an increase in the use of recycled content in things like heavy-duty shipping sacks, bags for lawn-and-garden, for fertilizer, even resin bags and in lots of other applications as well. There are some applications where recycled content may currently be used in a small amount, and I expect more would be used there.

However, the types of materials that feed into those applications are going to depend on the performance requirements of the individual application and the particular materials that are used. If you’re making an all-polyethylene bag, most likely you would only put polyethylene, or compatible materials, into that application. For example, you might recycle a bread bag and put it into a heavy-duty shipping sack for fertilizer because that’s polyethylene going into a polyethylene application.

If the materials are multilayer laminates of flexible packaging that contain multiple polymers, then those materials probably won’t be used in film applications because the physical properties are reduced when you use multiple materials together, even if you compatibilize them. I’m talking about truly incompatible materials here, such as a complex lamination containing PET, nylon, EVOH [ethylene vinyl alcohol], polyethylene and several tie layer materials.

If the materials can be compatibilized, then they can be used. Polyethylene and EVOH, for example, can be compatibilized with a compatibilizer. And they can be used in what would otherwise be an all-polyethylene application. So you could take that combination and put it into a shipping sack, a merchandise bag, a grocery bag, a mattress bag, or a newspaper bag. Most kinds of polyethylene films that contain recycled content, or could contain recycled content, can use simple multilayer structures that can be compatibilized.

But if you look at a more complicated structure—like a lamination that’s PET laminated to metallized PET laminated to a barrier film laminated to a sealant film—those types of structures are not going to be mechanically recycled back into films any time in the near future, I don’t think.

 

Do you think an increase in recycled content being used in some applications of flexible packaging…do you see that as important to help drive further flexible packaging recycling?

Wooster: I don’t think it’s necessary to have the use of recycled materials be in flexible packaging specifically. I do think it’s necessary to have the use of recycled materials in some applications that can drive enough volume to grow the demand part of it.

Let’s say, for example, some company decides to make plastic pallets with recycled films and they need more recycled films to be able to make the number of pallets that they have orders for. That will drive collection and recycling of the films that are used as the feedstock to make the pallets.

Collected flexible packaging doesn’t have to go into new flexible packaging application to drive demand. It can go into any application. But you want to find an application where specifically flexible packaging is useful. So the composition of materials, the melt flow and other characteristics of the polymers needs to be right—you have to find an application where that’s useful for the end-use requirements to drive the demand that will then help to generate the supply and make the whole system work. It’s a complex system that will take some coordination, but I believe there’s a lot of opportunity ahead.

 

Original Source: http://www.packagingdigest.com/flexible-packaging/how-to-increase-recycling-of-flexible-packaging-2017-03-15

Designing Product Labels When Space Is Limited

In label design space is limited.  It is important that designers deliver their message in a clear and concise manner within the limited space available on the label.  This needs to occur while making sure that key elements are not left out.  When designing a label, the graphic designer must work in conjunction with the manufacturer and design team to create something visually appealing and effective at marketing the product.

The product label holds a variety of information that is important to consumers.  Some key information that is needed on the label includes:

  • The product/brand name
  • A product logo if it is applicable
  • The size, quantity or weight of the product
  • A description of the product
  • Product tag line
  • Ingredient lists
  • Direction on using the product
  • Item barcode

Two of these items, the product story and directions tend to be longer and may need to be edited to avoid becoming too wordy.  If you want to have more product information available to consumers put it online or on the outside of the packages case.

With custom product labeling it is important that it is easily read.  Designers need to make sure that the label is clearly legible.  The font size and color are crucial elements.  For really important information designers should strive to use font that is ten points or larger.  Text that is not crucial should be no less than six points.  The color of the font is also significant.  It should contrast with the background color.   A bright font is often good because it is thought to entice people into making a purchase.  The color font that is used may also depend on the product and its existing aesthetic appeal.

In custom product labeling it is best to use a solid color for the background.  A pattern or photo when used for the background really affects the readability of the label.  Both options, a pattern or a photo, are not conducive to the readability and presentation of text.   It is important to have blank space, otherwise known as white space within your label.  This is favorable as it separates information and creates a visual distinction within the label as well.  White space within a label is an understated minimalist way to state what needs to be stated without being overwhelming.  It offers a calm and open feel to the label design.

At Anchor Printing, we take pride in offering our clients cut & stack labeling, pressure sensitive labels, roll-fed labeling, shrink sleeves as well as flexible packaging options. Contact us today at http://anchorprinting.com for all of your product label design, printing and packaging needs.

Label Design Tips To Increase Sales

Designing product labels for food products can be quite a challenge.  It is important to design a label that depicts the food while capturing the company behind it.  The test comes from creating a design that is marketable that increases sales over the competition for the targeted audience.  Below are some tips that can be employed for food product labels to ensure they keep going through the checkout line.

Know The Targeted Audience

Before you can even begin designing a concept for a food label you must know what your customers are looking for.  What problems do your consumers have and how does your product solve it for them?  Food labels have to do everything a normal product label does and so much more.  Food labels must promote quality and freshness.  In order to design a food label that accurately reflects the product it is crucial to understand what the audience is expecting.  Keep in mind the demographics of your target; anything from age to income level can affect the way a consumer views a product label.

Know The Competition

In a sea of competitors it is important that your product stand out.  Your label should be different from your competition without ignoring the expectations of the consumer.  Meet consumers at the shelf in a fresh and insightful manner that grabs their attention and sets you apart from the competition.

Show The Food

It is one thing to design a label that showcases and image of the food inside but an entirely different thing to actually show the product inside.  Consumers that actually get to see the actual product and treat they are about to taste are more drawn into the purchase.

Emphasize Ingredients and Product Features

Instead of showing consumers the end products showcase the products that went into making it.  Highlight features in an easy to appreciate way on the label itself.  Showcase the features that set your product apart from others on the shelf right next to it.  If your product has won contests or has all organic ingredients the label is the appropriate place to display this information.

Post-Sale Marketing

Never underestimate the power of your label.  From the backside to the inside companies have valuable real estate to use to market their products.  Don’t waste any space when designing your food label.  A valuable way to use the interior of the label is to include recipes or a coupon on their next purchase.

Marketing food products is a challenge but a fun one.  Using these tips when designing your next food label will help to ensure your product moves from the shelf into the consumer’s tummy.

At Anchor Printing, we take pride in offering our clients cut & stack labeling, pressure sensitive labels, roll-fed labeling, shrink sleeves as well as flexible packaging options. Contact us today at http://anchorprinting.com for all of your product label design, printing and packaging needs.